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20121215
20121215
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
and applause ) stephen, stephen, stephen! >> thank you, thank you ladies and gentlemen. i got to tell you. that is so beautiful. that is so beautiful. i will take that sound. i will take that sound over jingle bells any day. nation, tonight is my last episode before three weeks off. but i'm not looking ahead to the break. i've already started. (cheers and applause) >> that is not a prop. whooo! >> there are still some important stories to talk about there, folks. like last night's megaconcert to help the victims of hurricane sandy. >> all eyes were on new york city last night for the 12-12-12 benefit show to help victims of superstorm sandy. paul mccartney, the rolling stones, eric clapton, bruce springsteen and billy joel were among all the rock 'n' roll heroes that came out to perform. >> stephen: but they were all just opening acts for rock legend stephen colbert! (cheers and applause) i was honored. folks, i got to say, i was honored to be there and to be just off stage where i filmed mick jagger shaking his sexy bag of bones. here we go. (cheers and applause) just me and mick. you kn
to see you, thanks for coming on the show. >> this is cool. i can't believe i'm sitting here. >> stephen: it's real lucite, baby. let me ask you, so i would think the hardest thing to do in acting is dance, like just be uninhibitied. i don't think-- i can barely do it at parties when i'm hammered. >> you know, this is me most of the time. i'm definitely -- >> a wall flower. >> absolutely. >> stephen: so how do they-- what do they do to get you guys to be uninhibitied or to let loose? do they have to-- is that two hours into it, how do they do it? >> you're doing on the road, don't mess it up. >> did you feel that pressure. >> yeah, i think that was the main thing that sort of kick started everything for us, is we sort of felt like we would do anything for it yeah, i was pretty scared of that scene. because my mom-- homes are few and far between where i really get to exhibit, you know, like pure sort of wild nature, exuberance. >> stephen: and are you such a muse in the film that it is such an important catalyst element. >> yes, it is. she definitely needed to represent what the it of on
with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because they're one of the most vulnerable set of students that we have. the average family income for these students is $24,000 a year. they're not eligible for federal financial aid. they're not eligible for pell grants. and so they've overcome great odds just to get to berkeley and we want to keep them as our chancellor, chancellor burgeneaux, who's been an amazing leader on this issue, has said we can't afford to lose this talent in california and we want to keep it here. not only are we offering financial aid, we're actually building a comprehensive support system for them. and we have an academic counselor, a lending librar
children cope in the wake of the tragedy. stephen brock is a professor of school psychology at california state university in sacramento. he's a member of an emergency assistance team for the national association of school psychologists. dewey cornell is director of the youth violence project at the university of virginia. he is a forensic clinical psychologist. we hope to be joined by mo canady is the executive director of the national association of school resource officials, which works on school based policing and security. for now i want to welcome both stephen brock and dewey cornell. i will start with you stephen brock. you've dealt with this sort of thing before. what was your reaction when you heard this today? >> well, as a school psychologist, as a father, as a person who is no stranger to this kind of loss t was quite simply devastating. just a very sad day. >> warner: and dewey cornell. >> terrible tragedy and very frustrating that we weren't able to prevent this. >> let me stay with you, dewey cornell, you have as he said worked with this sort of thing. people look at this a
and secury. for now i want to welcome both stephen brock and dewey cornell. i will start with you stephen brock. you've dealt with this sort of thing before. what was your reaction when you heard this today? >> well, as a school psychologist, as a father, as a person who is no stranger to this kind of loss t was quite simply devastating. just a very sad day. >> warner: and dewey cornell. >> terrible tragedy and very frustrating that we weren't able to prevent this. >> let me stay with you, dewey cornell, you have as he said wked wi this sort of thing. people look at this and think how could it happen. what do you say when your friends, your colleagues, people who know the work you do, how do you answer that question? >> well, the first thing i try to point out is that calling this a school shooting is a bit of a misnomer. it is a mass shotting that happened to occur in a school. schools are very safe places. we know objectively that students are safer in school than almost anyplace else. but what's really critical is to understand the relationship between the shooter and the victims. we l
with the neighbor. >> thank you. [speaker not understood]. >> stephen taylor, [speaker not understood]. >>> good evening. my name is stephen tabor. central task force, i'm also the transportation chair for russian hill neighbors. you'll be hearing from russian hill neighbor president so i will confine my remarks to spur. spur has supported this project vigorously since its inception. we have supported the four corridors plan which is based on this project, encompasses two of the four corridors. our major criticism against this project that we have had for some time is it doesn't go far enough. it needs to be extended so that it encompasses the entire north beach corridor. and our principal aim is to make sure that whatever happens does not preclude the extension. we are working very closely with mta and others to begin the study for the extension. we strongly support option number 4, which by the way, contrary to what the previous speaker said, was overwhelmingly supported at the meeting, citizens meeting on the 19th. only a small number of people supported option 2. most of the people there als
here for this item. stephen suzuki, tracy parent, and joseph manalo. >>> good afternoon, supervisors. my name is steve suzuki, i'm executive director of asian neighborhood design. as mentioned, i'm one of the potential awardees for the work. a & d is an architecture community-based planning [speaker not understood] organization in south of market. we are very excited about this prospect as we have very com petent staff that will be looking at asset mapping and assessment of the existing conditions in the south of market. my staff, consultant has done a lot of work [speaker not understood] in the south of market and other neighborhoods. we look at this effort as a twofold thing. we're work, with other contractors. [speaker not understood] on this. it's a community-based effort. from the bricks and mortar side it is really as we said mapping out the assets in term of affordable housing businesses. the elements that are in south of market that we really need to understand as we strategize and look at the analysis of the threats and strengths of the area. the other important part of this
exposure therapy. >> comfortable. >> yes. >> you can hear me. >>es. >> stephen king was there the day to the we ares fell. and he's been dealing with it ever since. >> i had a, just such a total feeling that i wasn't the same person. >> like many other rescue workers king has post traumatic stress disorder. he's been through therapy but it didn't work. so now he's trying this virtual therapy. >> i was almost shaking. i mean it brought it back like i was there again watching it. >> it's called virtual reality therapy or vrt. and it uses sounds and 3 d images to force patients to face their fears. >> very slowly patients are taken back to their traumatic experiences. and steven's case, a virtual journey back to september 11th. >> here's how it works. first the patient sees the towers as they were before the attacks. then a plane appears and flies behind to the percent. experts say this readies the patient for what is about to happen. next a plane hits the first tower but without sound. then the fullxperience authentic pictures and surrounds taken from video shot that dayment because it
programs about economics. arlie hochschild. then tomorrow stephen han and sara gordon sit down with booktv to talk about their books. also on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern danny danon discussing his book, "israel: the will to prevail," followed by patrick tyler, author of "fortress israel: the inside story of the military elite who run the country and why they can't make peace." watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule can, visit booktv.org. >> strangle me -- [inaudible] >> give it to him hard! >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us, i think, in this country we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us had experienced in one way or another and had had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say, hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was of a moment where there is a possibility for change, and dire
times" stephen diner, and also the professor of politics at asu. thank you. take it away. >> hello. good to have you here. i am a politics editor at "the washington times. " i think you can learn a lot about the national stage from the latino voter, from what went on in arizona, particularly the limits, test the limits of what we can learn about latino voters and their effect on the electoral politics and on policy. i guess i would like to start with a basic question. if someone were to ask me, what the white voter is? i would have no clue how to answer that question. what is the latino voter in arizona? how much of the electorate, how much of the population, is to listen rate, who is that person. as many of the audience know, the latino population is very perverse. mexican-american, cupid and porter ricans. the latino population is like in neighboring states, primarily of mexican origin. one thing that is unique is a lot of them are recent arrivals, not necessarily for a-porn, but having migrated from california to new mexico because the drop of jobs opportunity if the past decade or so
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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